Archives for category: gallery exhibitions

Austrian artist Andreas Franke has just launched a ground-breaking underwater art installation off the coast of Sanibel Island in Florida entitled Mohawk Project:  The Life Above Refined Below.  Using sunken World War II battleship the USS Mohawk, magnets attach the twelve photo exhibition to the iron hull.  Exploring themes of love, loss, and youth at a time when the world was at war, Franke has evoked a sense of life and love transcending death, a defiance of the devastation and suffering experienced during that period.  Most importantly, it reminds us of just how young and optimistic those sailors and their sweethearts were all those years ago, and how quickly lives were changed and loves were lost.

The USS Mohawk, or “Mighty Mo,” was sunk last year to act as an artificial reef.  The ship that helped carry off the D-Day invasion in Normandy, France also survived 14 Nazi attacks and rescued more than 300 sailors from torpedoed ships during WWII.  Franke first photographed the ghostly ship swarming with fish while diving in August.  He then shot a second series of photographs featuring contemporary models in 1940s styling that were then superimposed over the original shots.  Franke says, “I imagined these sailors waiting in the North Atlantic for a German sub to attack them, so in these images I tried to make their lives a little bit nicer with the girls on board.  If I was there, what would I want?  It’s a dream, a fantasy land for sailors.”

This Mohawk Project is another exhibition in a series of underwater exhibitions by Andreas Franke.  He also displayed retro images on the WWII ship USNS General Hoty S. Vandenberg and photos of Renaissance aristocracy frolicking on sunken freighter ship SS Stavronikita.  The Mohawk Project underwater exhibition will be attached to the ship until September, where it will then be exhibited in more conventional, land-bound galleries.  For more information, please visit the artist’s website here.

Image 5 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 5 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 10 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 10 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 2 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 2 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 1 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 1 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 11 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 11 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 6 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 6 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 7 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 7 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 12 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 12 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 3 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 3 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

-Jayme Catalano

San Francisco artist Dave Young V explores a militarized, anarchist, post-apocalyptic future in his large format paintings, drawings, and three dimensional works.  In addition to the graphic pen and ink drawings he is known for, he re-appropriates elements for the three-dimensional works including automatic rifles, helmets, a fully-functional flame thrower, ammo boxes and even a full-size automobile (a collaboration with artist Eddie Colla).  Young V says that the name of his upcoming exhibition, “The New Race,” is “more of an implication to allow the viewer’s mind to wander into the possibilities of not only where we may be going as a society or culture but also as a species.  My work as always worked on the loose premise of a ‘post-apocalyptic’ world.  Each installment thus far has been an exploration of people, languages and aesthetic of that world.  ‘The New Race’ will continue in that vein, only stepping further into the implications of genetic engineering, cloning, human reproduction, the biological fusion of technology as a natural part of our evolution, and question notions of racial and cultural identity in this new hypothetical world.”  The exhibition opens at the White Walls Gallery in San Francisco on Saturday, January 12th and continues through February 2nd.  You can find more information about the artist here and at the gallery website.

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Dave Young V

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Untitled 11 by Dave Young V

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Dave Young V

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WP1 by Dave Young V

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MML-4 by Dave Young V

-Jayme Catalano

I was so honored to be a guest on the What is Art? Blog Talk Radio show recently.  Our topics of conversation included public relations for artists in the digital age, the rise of social media and visual marketing, branding, and advice on raising your profile among galleries, buyers, and the press.  Take half an hour to listen.

-Jayme Catalano

Chris Cunningham has staged the world’s first “Laser Fueled Robo-Sex Ballet,” Jaqapparatus1.  He began his career sculpting prosthetics, contributing to films like Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, and A.I.  He went on to redefine MTV in the 1990s, creating seminal music videos for Bjork, Madonna, and Aphex Twin.  After realizing that creating music videos for other artist’s music could be incredibly limiting, Cunningham began creating his music and accompanying videos, employing all the tricks of the trade he had mastered while working in the special effects industry, an effort which culminated in a series of live audio-visual performances in Japan and Europe.  His first installation, Jaqapparatus1, is currently on exhibition at Audi City London.  Two laser-firing robots engage in a brutal, almost sexual dance on a shadowy, sci-fi set.  Comprised of two Talos motion-controlled camera rigs, Cunningham mounted powerful lasers which the robots use to “attack, repel, and communicate with each other, a kind of duel, a surreal mating display which sees each machine trying to dominate the other.”  Watch the video below for a glimpse of the Robo-Sex Ballet.

VIDEO:  Jaqappartus1 for Audi City London

-Jayme Catalano

The Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis, Minnesota is the physical embodiment of jazz, at least according to its architect Frank Gehry.  A temple to modern architecture and what some may call the Bilbao Effect, the museum is a collection of undulating curves, shiny metal and rivets, a futuristic Ait Benhaddou in a Midwestern oasis.  As Gehry says, “Liquid architecture.  It’s like jazz- you improvise, you work together, you play off each other, you make something, they make something.  And I think it’s a way of – for me, it’s a way of trying to understand the city, and what might happen in the city.”  He believes, “Architecture should speak of its time and place, but yearn for timelessness.”  The museum, located on the University of Minnesota campus, is  open Tuesdays through Sundays and admission is always free.  Click here to learn more.

Photo by Philip Harvey. All rights reserved.

Photo by Philip Harvey. All rights reserved.

Photo by Philip Harvey. All rights reserved.

Photo by Philip Harvey. All rights reserved.

To see more work by photographer Philip Harvey, click here.

-Jayme Catalano

The Art WithOut Labels retail gallery is a hip space filled with the artwork of emerging local and international artists.  Created by artists and designers with developmental and related disabilities, much of the work is slightly irreverent and endearingly whimsical.  Started by the non-profit group Alchemia, AWOL empowers artists and provides an opportunity for the community to recognize and support their astounding talent.  The mission of AWOL is “to create a public venue where the intersection of people, media, and invention help to create a more open and inviting community for all.”  AWOL’s artists are talented and unique and their artwork is a reminder that artistry transcends limitations.

If you would like to inquire about purchasing artwork or donating funds to the non-profit organization, please contact Susan Boyle at (415) 320-2126 or email susan[at]alchemia.org.  You can visit the website here.

Bird on Branch, courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

The De Young in San Francisco has staged a ground-breaking multimedia exhibit featuring 140 of John Paul Gaultier’s haute couture designs.  With a career spanning more than forty years, the context of Gaultier’s work is often gritty and controversial although the superb craftsmanship and detail ensure the work is always beautiful.  Known in popular culture for his work with Madonna in the 90s and his costume design on The Fifth Element and City of Lost Children, Gaultier’s work transcends high fashion into fine art.  Working in collaboration with Montreal-based theater company Ubu Compagnie de Creation, the exhibit includes 30 animated mannequins who talk, sing, and blink in an eerily lifelike way.  The exhibit runs through August 19th.

An animated mannequin.

A wedding gown.

Beaded dress that took 1002 hours to complete.

For more information on the exhibit, visit the De Young website.

-Jayme Catalano

Artist Anne Lindberg’s string drawings bring to mind supernatural, phantasmal matter floating peacefully and brilliantly in mid-air.  She creates sculptures and drawings that she calls “systemic and non-representational…subtle, rhythmic, abstract, and immersive.”  Lindberg utilizes shifts in layering, tool, and material to create tonal passages that resonate with primal human conditions:  goodwill, anxiety, fear, security, self-protection, sexuality, gravity, and compulsive behaviors.  Her string installations are constructed using thousands of individual strands of Egyptian cotton thread and staples.  View the time lapse video of her recent installation “Drawn Pink” in Placemakers at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art.

Drawn Pink (2012) by Anne Lindberg

Drawn Pink (2012) by Anne Lindberg

For more information on the artist, visit her website.

-Jayme Catalano

The de Young Museum in San Francisco is currently hosting their most popular annual fundraising event and exhibition, the Bouquets to Art.  150 floral designers took inspiration from the permanent collection at the museum to create works that pay tribute to the original works.  The exhibition runs through March 17th.

Two floral designs inspired by the artworks pictured behind them

Two more modern floral designs inspired by the modern works pictured behind them

Walking

For more information on the exhibit, click here.

-Jayme Catalano

The Gold Scab by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1879.

James Whistler is most famously known for the boldly composed painting of his mother, ‘Arrangements in Grey and Black No. 1.’  ‘The Gold Scab’ is a stark departure:  modern, angry, and comical.  It resembles something out of the oeuvre of Picasso or Dr. Seuss, not a Victorian artist known mostly for sweet portraits of women in somber grey or billowy white.

Directly before embarking on a costly and ruinous libel suit against art critic John Ruskin, Whistler was commissioned to “touch up” a decorative mural in the home of Frederick Leyland.  His task was to “harmonize” the room, improve upon the work done by another interior decorative artist.  Instead, Whistler “went on-without design or sketch-putting in every touch with such freedom…I forgot everything in my joy in it.”  He created a room awash in brilliant blue-green and gold leaf, a complete re-design of the original; he called his masterpiece ‘Harmony in Blue and Gold:  The Peacock Room.’  Leyland, furious with the drastic and unauthorized changes, refused to pay Whistler’s commission fee.  The loss of this much-needed income, a ruined reputation with other art patrons, and his disastrous libel suit against Ruskin resulted in bankruptcy.  Whistler’s beloved White House and his belongings were auctioned off by his creditors, including Leyland.

The enraged artist painted a caricature of Frederick Leyland as a greedy, vain and contemptible peacock sitting atop Whistler’s beloved White House.  The painting is an aggressive personal attack on Leyland and a bitter representation of Whistler’s own anger and disappointment.  He left the painting hanging prominently when his home and its contents were seized, a giant middle finger to Leyland and his other creditors.  The painting and a life-size photographic reproduction of the Peacock Room are currently being exhibited at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco through June 17.

For more information on The Cult of Beauty:  The Victorian Avant-Garde, 1860-1900, visit the Legion of Honor website.

-Jayme Catalano