Archives for category: Photoshop

Austrian artist Andreas Franke has just launched a ground-breaking underwater art installation off the coast of Sanibel Island in Florida entitled Mohawk Project:  The Life Above Refined Below.  Using sunken World War II battleship the USS Mohawk, magnets attach the twelve photo exhibition to the iron hull.  Exploring themes of love, loss, and youth at a time when the world was at war, Franke has evoked a sense of life and love transcending death, a defiance of the devastation and suffering experienced during that period.  Most importantly, it reminds us of just how young and optimistic those sailors and their sweethearts were all those years ago, and how quickly lives were changed and loves were lost.

The USS Mohawk, or “Mighty Mo,” was sunk last year to act as an artificial reef.  The ship that helped carry off the D-Day invasion in Normandy, France also survived 14 Nazi attacks and rescued more than 300 sailors from torpedoed ships during WWII.  Franke first photographed the ghostly ship swarming with fish while diving in August.  He then shot a second series of photographs featuring contemporary models in 1940s styling that were then superimposed over the original shots.  Franke says, “I imagined these sailors waiting in the North Atlantic for a German sub to attack them, so in these images I tried to make their lives a little bit nicer with the girls on board.  If I was there, what would I want?  It’s a dream, a fantasy land for sailors.”

This Mohawk Project is another exhibition in a series of underwater exhibitions by Andreas Franke.  He also displayed retro images on the WWII ship USNS General Hoty S. Vandenberg and photos of Renaissance aristocracy frolicking on sunken freighter ship SS Stavronikita.  The Mohawk Project underwater exhibition will be attached to the ship until September, where it will then be exhibited in more conventional, land-bound galleries.  For more information, please visit the artist’s website here.

Image 5 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 5 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 10 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 10 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 2 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 2 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 1 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 1 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 11 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 11 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 6 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 6 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 7 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 7 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 12 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 12 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 3 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

Image 3 from the Mohawk Project by Andreas Franke, 2013

-Jayme Catalano

When independent game developer John Nelson Rose approached me about branding, marketing, and designing the user interface for his new puzzle game, I couldn’t have been more thrilled. The task granted me the opportunity to combine my skills in graphic design with interactivity while challenging me in ways I had never imagined.

I started the process by thinking about names for the game. It was important to the developer that the title be simple, relatively short, and very descriptive of the game play itself. The central game mechanic is moving columns and rows of colored circles left and right, up and down to make two-by-two (or larger) squares. The name “Circle Squared” seemed the most fitting.

Once the name had been settled upon, I moved forward with designing the look and feel of the game. Inspired by a mid-century, minimalist design aesthetic, I settled upon using the font Century Gothic in white against black, all lower case with certain of the round spaces filled in with coordinating colored circles. The resulting menu and in-game screens are minimalist and very bold.

Establishing a color story that was pleasing to the eye and true to the branding of the game proved to be a bit of a trial and error process. In addition to coordinating beautiful colors that showed well against a saturated black background, I also had to make sure that the order in which the colors appeared in progressing difficulty levels was finely-tuned to avoid certain combinations. The resulting palette of plum, canary yellow, salmon pink, avocado green, cool red, warm baby blue, tangerine, and denim blue has been universally praised by those who have played the game.  If you don’t believe me, download the game and see for yourself.

While it’s a small start, I’m so excited to have officially launched my “indie” game career and I look forward to future collaborations.  Check out John’s website for details on upcoming title releases.

-Jayme Catalano

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German artist Catrin Welz-Stein creates her works by digitally collaging old illustrations and photographs.   She combines, divides, removes, fills and retouches elements in Adobe Photoshop to produce digital images that explore the worlds of fantasy and fairy tale.  She says her images, “speak from inner feelings which we often hide in our daily life.”  A former professional graphic art designer, she feels free from the rules and compromises she felt in creating art for clients.  She now enjoys “creating art that does not explain itself from the beginning.”  Based in Malaysia, she says “a large part of my work is the search for license-free images, illustrations or photophos, for which the copyright has long expired.  Old books, magazines and the Internet are my primary resources for that.  Once I have found a fitting image, I break it into pieces, until the original image is no longer recognizable and an entirely new image is created.”  Visit her website to see more of her images or purchase the artwork at Redbubble.

Summer Dreaming by Catrin Welz-Stein

Summer Dreaming by Catrin Welz-Stein

Bye Bye Butterfly by Catrin Welz-Stein

Bye Bye Butterfly by Catrin Welz-Stein

Frau Holle by Catrin Welz-Stein

Frau Holle by Catrin Welz-Stein

She Took Her Wings and Walked by Catrin Welz-Stein

She Took Her Wings and Walked by Catrin Welz-Stein

Her Garden by Catrin Welz-Stein

Her Garden by Catrin Welz-Stein

Peacock by Catrin Welz-Stein

Peacock by Catrin Welz-Stein

Autumn by Catrin Welz-Stein

Autumn by Catrin Welz-Stein

-Jayme Catalano

Image Blender for the iPhone is an ingenious little program that allows the user to blend two images together to create a trippy little masterpiece.  The $2 app offers endless possibilities for layering, masking, and filtering, all with a single swipe of a finger, simplifying an otherwise complicated and time consuming process in Photoshop.  To purchase, visit the iTunes Store.

-Jayme Catalano

Inspired by Anna Utopia Giordano’s ‘Venus’ project, I decided to apply today’s standard of beauty to Leonardo DaVinci’s Mona Lisa.  I plumped her lips, made her eyes larger, slimmed and elongated her neck, trimmed her double chin, hands and arms, and removed the bags under her eyes.

Mona Lisa after a Photoshop transformation.

If you haven’t seen it yet, the Dove Evolution video illustrates the extent of Photoshop in advertising today.

-Jayme Catalano

As the media loves to point out, our perceptions of realistic, attainable beauty standards have been radically changed by the ubiquity of Photoshop, adolescent runway models, and deceptive advertising.  What if the aesthetic standards of  our modern society had belonged to the great artists of the past?  Italian fashion model and artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created ‘Venus’, ten works that combine aesthetic harmony with the contemporary eye.  She has transformed classic Zaftig representations of the goddess Venus into slender, slim-waisted, busty waifs.  The result is strangely haunting.

Anna Utopia Giordano's Photoshop transformations of classic masterpieces are on the right. From top The Birth of Venus by Alexandre Cabanel, The Birth of Venus by Botticelli, Venus at her Mirror by Diego Velazquez, The Sleeping Venus by Artemisia Gentilischi.

For more information, please visit Giordano’s website.

-Jayme Catalano